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Literary Circle: Sunday, February 26

Literary Circle: Sunday, February 26

Sunday, February 26
7pm ET
Via Zoom
For Wellesley alumnae of African descent

We all think we know the South. Even those who have never lived there, who have never even been there, can rattle off a list of signifiers that define the South for them: Gone with the Wind, the Civil War, the Ku Klux Klan, cotillions, plantations, football, Jim Crow, and, of course, slavery. For those who live outside the region, the South is very much about the profound difference between "us" and "them." In South to America, Imani Perry shows in detail by infinitely careful detail that the meaning of American is inextricably linked with the South, and if we are American, we are all at least a little bit Southern.

This is the story of a woman going home--a Black woman and a Southern home--at a time when ideas of how the South should be are rising once again. South to America is an assertion that if we do indeed want to build a more humane future for the United States, we must center our concern below the Mason-Dixon Line.

Summary: TheStorygraph.com

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